Can Skiing Keep You Young? with ATI Physical Therapy

Peter Braun, Athletic Trainer for ATI Physical Therapy, discusses skiing and his article on its antiaging effects. He gives advice on how to develop as a skier as well as how to adjust to the different seasons of skiing.

Interview with Dave Heidloff, Manager of Sports Performance at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, about the new Sports Performance facility in Oak Brook, Illinois. Services offered include functional sports assessment, sensor and video-based biomechanical analysis of body movement, blood flow restriction training, and standard sports assessment.

Ask the Doctor segment: Dr. Bush-Joseph from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush answers questions about Tennis-Elbow treatment and when muscle soreness should be evaluated.

By: Peter Braun MS, LAT, ATC, ITAT

The effects of time on one’s body are unavoidable and often substantial. Many of us in the field of medicine are in an endless search to find the perfect sport, activity or exercise that will unlock our physical potential, well into our years. Scientific research has found that there are certain factors that contribute to longevity and sustainability. Bone density, lower extremity strength, balance and cardiovascular endurance all play critical roles in maintaining a physically active lifestyle. With this, physicians make an effort to integrate these factors into exercise plans for much of our elderly population. But what if there was a simpler answer? What if we could prescribe involvement in a recreational activity that naturally addresses all these areas? As we unravel the details, we challenge the question; “Is there such a thing as an anti-aging activity?”

Snow Skiing and bone integrity

As we dive into the leading factors that affect our ability to remain physically active, it is important to begin by discussing the foundation of our musculoskeletal system: our bones. Proper bone integrity allows our joints and muscles to function at peak levels. As more research is released clarifying the comorbid factors associated with aging, we are realizing how important bone density truly is. As we get older, it is natural to lead a more sedentary lifestyle. This reduces the forces exerted on our bones and leads to less deposition and remodeling. Consequently, bones become weaker and more fragile.

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